Protest: Dekalb Schools bullying report on Herrera suicide

By Jonathan Shapiro
Public Broadcasting Atlanta
ATLANTA, GA (WABE) — State Senator Vincent Fort of Atlanta and a handful of other community activists strongly dispute Dekalb County’s recently released report on the death of Jaheem Herrera.

FORT: We object to them releasing a smear report on Jaheem trying to divert responsibility.
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DeKalb Schools: Bullying didn’t prompt Herrera suicide

By MATT SCHAFER
Southern Voice
The DeKalb County School System has released a written report detailing the system’s findings on the suicide of Jaheem Herrera, an 11-year-old fifth grade student who hanged himself April 16.

The 300-plus page report was submitted to the school system by retired Fulton County Superior Court Judge Thelma Moore on Aug. 14 and released to the public by the school system on Aug. 26. Moore was hired by the system to investigate Herrera’s death after his mother alleged her son’s suicide stemmed from constant bullying, including being called gay, at his school, Dunaire Elementary.
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DeKalb, Ga. parents urge strong school anti-bullying policy

By George Franco
DEKALB COUNTY, Ga. — Several dozen protestors turned out Monday night to call for a better approach to handling bullies in the DeKalb school district. They’re angry over the district’s handling of the investigation into the suicide death of Jaheem Herrerra a few months ago.

A group of activists said they picked Monday to call for more accountability and transparency when it comes to bullying in DeKalb schools because students begin school next Monday. And they said they don’t want another case like Jaheem Herrera to happen again.
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“The Bee Hive” commentary: Homophobia is killing our kids

By E.N. Jackson
Frost Illustrated
Last week I watched in horror as ministers, church officials, and parishioners of a black Connecticut church, Manifested Glory Ministries, invoked the name of Jesus to release the “gay demons” supposedly possessing the soul of a 16-year-old boy. What I was watching was not a horror movie but a YouTube video clip that had been sent to me by a friend.
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Anti-bullying platform: Gay teacher makes bid for Atlanta School Board

By MATT SCHAFER
Southern Voice
Just a few months after dropping out of the race for the Atlanta City Council District 6 seat, Charlie Stadtlander, a gay elementary school teacher, announced his run for the District 3 post in the Atlanta School Board race.

Stadtlander, who teaches in DeKalb County, will challenge incumbent Cecily Harsch-Kinnane for the District 3 seat on the Atlanta’s Board of Education. If he wins, Stadtlander would be the first known openly gay man to serve on the city’s school board. Former school board president Mitzi Bickers came out as a lesbian when she made an unsuccessful run for chair of the Fulton County Commission.
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Jaheem Herrera suicide inspires town hall on bullying

Southern Voice
Young people will have the chance to speak out about their brushes with bullying at a town hall meeting Aug. 15 at the Hyatt Regency hosted by the Georgia Coalition Against Bullying.

The meeting is part of an ongoing response to the April 16 suicide of Jaheem Herrera, an 11-year-old fifth grader at Dunaire Elementary School. Herrera killed himself after enduring constant bullying by classmates, including being called “gay,” alleges his family.
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Atlanta Falcons Chauncey Davis regrets bullying past

As told to D. Orlando Ledbetter
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Falcons defensive end Chauncey Davis was usually the biggest kid in his class when he was growing up in Auburndale, Fla.

If he was a little short on lunch money, that was never a problem. He’d take somebody else’s. He admits he was a bully. But he changed.

Those childhood experiences — being bullied and getting bullied — help to explain why the death of Jaheem Herrera’s struck a chord with Davis. Herrea’s mother believes bullying at school led to her son’s suicide. The story tore at Davis’ heart.
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